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Biological Analogies in History

By: Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
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The Waste Land

By: T.S. Eliot

Excerpt: I. THE BURIAL OF THE DEAD APRIL is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers. Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade, And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten, And drank coffee, and talked for an hour. Bin gar keine Russin,...

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For Love of the King

By: Oscar Wilde

I am greatly repentant being so long in acknowledging receipt of Told on the Pagoda. I enjoyed reading the stories, and much admired their quaint and delicate charm. Burmah calls to me. Under another cover I am sending you a fairy play entitled For Love of the King, just for your own amusement. It is the outcome of long and luminous talks with your distinguished husband in the Temple and on the river, in the days when I was meditating writing a novel as beautiful and as ...

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Beyond Good and Evil

By: Friedrich Nietzsche

The Will to Truth, which is to tempt us to many a hazardous enterprise, the famous Truthfulness of which all philosophers have hitherto spoken with respect, what questions has this Will to Truth not laid before us! What strange, perplexing, questionable questions! It is already a long story; yet it seems as if it were hardly commenced. Is it any wonder if we at last grow distrustful, lose patience, and turn impatiently away? That this Sphinx teaches us at last to ask que...

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Philosophy of Right

By: G.W.F. Hegel

Economic Theory Literature

Excerpt: Translator?s Preface. In his preface, Hegel?s editor, Professor Eduard Gans, makes some interesting remarks upon the ?Philosophy of Right,? and informs us as to the way in which the matter of the book had been put together. He dates his preface May 29th, 1833, thirteen years, lacking one month, later than Hegel?s date for the completion of his own preface, and eighteen months after the philosopher?s death. Hegel had, it would appear, lived to see the outbreak of...

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A Municipal Report

By: O. Henry

Excerpt: East is East, and West is San Francisco, according to Californians. Californians are a race of people; they are not merely inhabitants of a State. They are the Southerners of the West. Now, Chicagoans are no less loyal to their city; but when you ask ...

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The Sleeper

By: Edgar Allan Poe
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The Pink Fairy Book

By: Andrew Lang, M.A.

Preface: All people in the world tell nursery tales to their children. The Japanese tell them, the Chinese, the Red Indians by their camp fires, the Eskimo in their dark dirty winter huts. The Kaffirs of South Africa tell them, and the modern Greeks, just as the old Egyptians did, when Moses had not been many years rescued out of the bulrushes. The Germans, French, Spanish, Italians, Danes, Highlanders tell them also, and the stories are apt to be like each other everywh...

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Cain

By: Lord George Gordon Byron (Lord Byron)

Excerpt: My Dear Moore, I dedicate to you the last production with which I shall trespass on public patience, and your indulgence, for some years; and I own that I feel anxious to avail myself of this latest and only opportunity of adorning my pages with a name consecrated by unshaken public principle, amid the most undoubted and various talents. While Ireland ranks you among the firmest of her patriots; while you stand alone the first of her bards in her estimation, and...

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How the Brigadier Played for a Kingdom

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Excerpt: It has sometimes struck me that some of you, when you have heard me tell these little adventures of mine, may have gone away with the impression that I was conceited. There could not be a greater mistake than this, for I have always observed that really fine soldiers are free from this failing. It is true that I have had to depict myself sometimes as brave, sometimes as full of resource, always as interesting; but, then, it really was so, and I had to take the f...

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Essays, First Series

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Excerpt: I. HISTORY. THERE is one mind common to all individual men. Every man is an inlet to the same and to all of the same. He that is once admitted to the right of reason is made a freeman of the whole estate. What Plato has thought, he may think; what a saint has felt, he may feel; what at any time has befallen any man, he can understand. Who hath access to this universal mind is a party to all that is or can be done, for this is the only and sovereign agent.

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Famous Men of Rome

By: John H. Haaren

Excerpt: The study of history, like the study of a landscape, should begin with the most conspicuous features.

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The Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe

By: Edgar Allan Poe; Harry C, Edwards
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The Fullness of Life

By: Edith Wharton

For hours she had lain in a kind of gentle torpor, not unlike that sweet lassitude which masters one in the hush of a midsummer noon, when the heat seems to have silenced the very birds and insects, and, lying sunk in the tasselled meadow-grasses, one looks up through a level roofing of maple-leaves at the vast shadowless, and unsuggestive blue. Now and then, at ever- lengthening intervals, a flash of pain darted through her, like the ripple of sheet-lightning across suc...

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Bibliography of the Writings of Charles and Mary Lamb : A Literary...

By: Thomson, J. C. (Joseph Charles), 1867
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Biographical Sketch of Moses Bigelow

By: Bigelow, Samuel Fowler, 1837-1915
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An Answer to the Question : What Is Enlightenment?

By: Immanuel Kant

Konigsberg in Prussia, 30th September, 1784. Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one's own understanding without the guidance of another. This immaturity is self-incurred if its cause is not lack of understanding, but lack of resolution and courage to use it without the guidance of another. The motto of enlightenment is therefore: Sapere aude! Have courage to use your own understanding!

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The Mystery of Cloomber

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Excerpt: THE HEGIRA OF THE WEST FROM EDINBURGH. I, James Fothergill West, student of law in the University of St. Andrews, have endeavored in the ensuing pages to lay my statement before the public in a concise and business-like fashion. It is not my wish to achieve literary success; nor have I any desire by the graces of my style, or by the artistic ordering of my incidents, to throw a deeper shadow over the strange passages of which I shall have to speak. My highest am...

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Brain and Personality; Or, The Physical Relations of the Brain to ...

By: Thomson, William Hanna, 1833-1918
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The Sense and Sensibility

By: Jane Austen

Excerpt: THE family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance. The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his si...

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