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List of tallest buildings in Baltimore

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Title: List of tallest buildings in Baltimore  
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List of tallest buildings in Baltimore

Skyline of Baltimore (Use cursor to identify buildings)

This list of tallest buildings in Baltimore ranks skyscrapers and high-rises in the U.S. city of Baltimore, Maryland by height. The tallest building in Baltimore is the 40-story Transamerica Tower (Baltimore), which rises 529 feet (161 m) and was completed in 1973.[1] It also stands as the tallest building in the state of Maryland and the tallest building on the East Coast between Philadelphia and Raleigh, after the RBC Plaza was built in 2008. The second-tallest building in the city and the state is the Bank of America Building, which is 509 feet (155 m) high.[2]

The history of skyscrapers in Baltimore began with the completion in 1889 of the Greater Baltimore Committee and the local Chamber of Commerce with the leadership of several mayoral administrations in 1958 continuing into the early 1970s, followed by a parallel soon-to-be nationally famous "Inner Harbor" redevelopment around the old waterfront piers, wharves, warehouses, offices and businesses of the former "Basin" along the Baltimore Harbor at the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River continued another major building boom from the early 1960s to the early 1990s, during which the City saw the completion of 18 of its 24 tallest buildings, including the 1973 United States Fidelity and Guarantee Company's new iconic headquarters (later the Legg Mason Building, now the Transamerica Tower) at the corner of the harbor at Pratt and Light Streets and the five-sides/pentagonal high-rise centerpiece of the harbor, the Baltimore World Trade Center for the Maryland Port Administration in 1977. The City is the site of two completed buildings that are at least 500 feet (152 m) high, with one more under construction and two proposed for construction. As of June 2008, there are 163 completed high-rises in the city.[4] The most recently completed skyscraper in Baltimore is 414 Water Street, which rises 344 feet (105 m) and 33 floors.[5]

Skyline of Baltimore's downtown central business district and Inner Harbor (formerly "The Basin") of the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River and Baltimore Port & Harbor

Tallest buildings

The 1973 United States Fidelity and Guarantee Company, later the Legg-Mason Building, now the Transamerica Tower is the tallest structure in both Baltimore and Maryland.
The copper-skinned William Donald Schaefer Building, the third-tallest building in the city with its corner spire, containing Maryland state offices, (originally built as the Merritt Tower of Merritt Savings and Loan Bank) at the northwest corner of East Baltimore and Light-St. Paul Streets
The 1977 Baltimore World Trade Center on Pier 2, East Pratt Street, the seventh-tallest building in Baltimore, and tallest pentagonal structure in the world
Bank of America Building
Commerce Place Baltimore
100 East Pratt Street
250 W. Pratt Street
414 Water Street (background)
HarborViewCondominium
Silo Point Condominium

This list ranks Baltimore skyscrapers that stand at least 300 feet (91 m) tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

Rank Name Height
ft (m)
Floors Year Notes
1 Transamerica Tower 529 (161) 40 1973 Has been the tallest building in Baltimore and Maryland since 1973. Tallest building on the east coast between Philadelphia and Raleigh. Tallest building in the Baltimore-Washington Combined Statistical Area. Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1970s. In 2011 the building was renamed the Transamerica Tower.[1][6]
2 Bank of America Building 509 (155) 37 1924 Tallest building in Baltimore constructed in the 1920s.[2][7]
3 William Donald Schaefer Building 493 (150) 37 1992 Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1990s.[8][9]
4 Commerce Place 454 (138) 31 1992 [10][11]
5 100 East Pratt Street 418 (128) 28 1992 [12][13]
6 Baltimore World Trade Center 405 (123) 32 1977 Tallest equilateral pentagonal building in the world.[14][15]
7 Tremont Plaza Hotel 395 (120) 37 1967 Tallest building in Baltimore constructed in the 1960s.[16][17]
8 Charles Towers South Apartments 385 (117) 30 1969 Tallest residential building in Baltimore. Also known as Two Charles Center.[18][19]
9 Legg Mason Tower 360.5 (110) 24 2009 [20][21][22]
10= Blaustein Building 360 (110) 30 1962 [23][24]
10= 250 West Pratt Street 360 (110) 24 1986 Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1980s.[25][26]
10= 1st Mariner Bank Tower 360 (110) 17 2006 [27][28][29]
13 Towers at Harbor Court 356 (109) 28 1987 [30][31]
14= 201 North Charles Street Building 350 (107) 28 1967 [32][33]
14= Charles Towers North Apartments 350 (107) 27 1967 Also known as Eight Charles Center.[34][35]
16 414 Water Street 344 (105) 33 2008 [5]
17 HarborView Condominium 342 (104) 29 1993 Also known as Harborview Tower.[36][37]
18= Charles Center South 330 (101) 25 1975 [38][39]
18= Wachovia Tower 330 (101) 24 1985 Formerly known as First Union Signet Tower. It is now known as the Wells Fargo Tower.[40][41]
20= Mercantile Bank & Trust Company 315 (96) 21 1969 [42][43]
20= M&T Bank Building 315 (96) 22 1972 Also known as the First Maryland Building.[44][45]
20= Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel 315 (96) 32 2001 Tallest hotel in Baltimore.[46]
23 Silo Point 310 (94) 24 1923 Under reconstruction.[47]
24 Vue Harbor East 306 (93) 30 2007 [48]
25 Baltimore Harbor Hotel 302 (92) 27 1967 [49][50]
26 Hilton Baltimore 224 (68) 20 2008 [51]

Tallest under construction or proposed

This lists buildings that are under construction or proposed for construction in Baltimore and are planned to rise at least 300 feet (91 m), but are not yet completed structures. A floor count of 40 stories is used as the cutoff for buildings whose heights have not yet been released by their developers.
Name Height
ft (m)
Floors Year*
(est.)
Status Notes
300 East Pratt Street - 48 - Under Development Design was overhauled to comply with new flood regulations.[52]
414 Light Street - 44 - Under Development Design is being overhauled to comply with new flood regulations.[53][54]
325 W. Baltimore St. - 30 - Under Construction [55]
The Mechanic Project - 32 - Construction stalled because of lawsuit with Parking Garage Operator [56]
Exelon Building - 20 2015 Under Construction [57]
Canton Crossing Project 400 (122) - - Proposed [58]
1 Light Street 404 (124) 33 - Under Development [59]

Timeline of tallest buildings

The Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower was the tallest building in Baltimore from 1911 until 1923.
1 Calvert Plaza

This lists buildings that once held the title of tallest building in Baltimore.

Name Street address Years as tallest Height
ft (m)
Floors Reference
Fidelity Building 05.0210 North Charles Street 1893–1901 220 (67) 15 [60]
One Calvert Plaza 04.0201 East Baltimore Street 1901–1911 249 (76) 16 [61]
Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower[A] 06.0312 West Lombard Street 1911–1923 289 (88) 15 [62]
Constellation Energy Building[A] 02.039 West Lexington Street 1916–1923 289 (88) 21 [63]
B&O Railroad Grain Terminal[B] 07.01700 Beason Street 1923–1924 310 (94) 24 [47]
Baltimore Trust Company Building[C] 01.010 Light Street 1924–1973 509 (155) 37 [7]
Transamerica Tower 03.0100 Light Street 1973–present 529 (161) 40 [6]

Notes

A. ^ a b The Constellation Energy Building, completed in 1916, tied the height of the Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower. The city therefore had two tallest buildings until the B&O Railroad Grain Terminal was completed in 1923.
B. ^ This building was constructed as the B&O Railroad Grain Terminal but has since been renamed Silo Point.
C. ^ This building was constructed as the Baltimore Trust Company Building but has since been renamed the Bank of America Building. In the past, the building has also known as the NationsBank Building, the Mathieson Building, the O'Sullivan Building and the Maryland National Bank.[64]

References

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External links

  • Diagram of Baltimore skyscrapers on SkyscraperPage
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