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Pythodorida of Pontus

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Pythodorida of Pontus

Pythodorida
Queen of Pontus
Queen consort of the Bosporan Kingdom
Queen consort of Cilicia
Queen consort of Cappadocia
Spouse King Polemon I of Pontus
King Archelaus of Cappadocia
Issue Artaxias III of Armenia
Polemon II of Pontus
Antonia Tryphaena, Queen of Thrace
Father Pythodoros of Tralles
Mother Antonia
Born 30 BC or 29 BC
Smyrna
Died AD 38 (aged 67 or 68)
Pontus

Pythodorida or Pythodoris of Pontus (Greek: Πυθοδωρίδα or Πυθοδωρίς, 30 BC or 29 BC – 38) was a Roman Client Queen of Pontus, the Bosporan Kingdom, Cilicia and Cappadocia.

Origins & Early Life

Pythodorida is also known as Pythodoris I and Pantos Pythodorida. According to an honorific inscription dedicated to her in Athens Greece in the late 1st century BC, her royal title was Queen Pythodorida Philometor (Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΑ ΠΥΘΟΔΩΡΙΔΑ ΦΙΛΟΜΗΤΩΡ). Philometor means "mother-loving" and this title is associated with the Greek Pharaohs and Queens of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

Pythodorida was born and raised in Smyrna (modern İzmir, Turkey). She was the daughter and only child of wealthy Anatolian Greek and friend to the late triumvir Pompey, Pythodoros of Tralles and Antonia. Pythodorida was half Roman and half Anatolian Greek. She was the namesake of her father.

Her maternal grandparents were the Roman triumvir Mark Antony and Antonia Hybrida Minor, who were paternal first cousins, however Pythodorida’s paternal grandparents are unknown. Pythodorida seems to the first-born grandchild born to the triumvir Antony.

Queen

About 14 BC, Pythodorida married King Polemon Pythodoros of Pontus as his second wife. She became Queen of Pontus and the Bosporan Kingdom when she married Polemon I. Polemon I was previously widowed by his first wife and had no natural children, except for a stepson.

Pythodorida and Polemon had two sons and one daughter, who were:

Polemon I died in 8 BC and Pythodorida became the sole Queen of Pontus until her death. Pythodorida was able to retain Colchis and Cilicia but the Bosporan Kingdom, she was unable to retain. The Bosporan Kingdom, was succeeded by her first husband's stepson Aspurgus.

After Polemon I died, she married King Archelaus of Cappadocia. Archelaus and Pythodorida had no children. Through her marriages, she became Roman Client Queen of Cappadocia. Pythodorida had moved with her children from Pontus to Cappadocia to live with Archelaus. When Archelaus died in 17, Cappadocia became a Roman province and she returned with her family back to Pontus.

In later years, Polemon II assisted his mother in the administration of the kingdom. When Pythodorida died, Polemon II succeeded her. Pythodorida was a friend and contemporary to the Greek geographer Strabo. Strabo is said to have described Pythodorida as a woman of virtuous character. Strabo considered her to have a great capacity for business and considered that under Pythodorida’s rule, Pontus had flourished.

Ancestry

See also

Sources

  • Vassal - Queens and Some Contemporary Women of the Roman Empire by Grace Harriet Macurdy (1937)
  • http://www.ancientlibrary.com/smith-bio/2962.html
  • http://www.guide2womenleaders.com/turkey_substates.htm
  • http://www.tyndalehouse.com/egypt/ptolemies/cleopatra_vii_fr.htm

External links

  • An Athenian Honorific Inscription dedicated to Queen Pythodorida, which is displayed at the Epigraphical Museum (inventory no. EM 9573) in Athens, Greece
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