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United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2012

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 to elect the seven U.S. Representatives from the state, one from each of the state's seven congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election. Primary elections were held on March 13, 2012; runoff elections were held on April 24.[1]

Contents

  • Redistricting 1
  • Overview 2
  • District 1 3
  • District 2 4
  • District 3 5
  • District 4 6
  • District 5 7
  • District 6 8
  • District 7 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

Redistricting

A redistricting bill was passed by the Alabama House of Representatives and Senate on June 2, 2011,[2] and signed into law by Governor Robert Bentley on June 8.[3] To comply with the 1965 Voting Rights Act, the map received approval from the U.S. Department of Justice or a federal court before it could be enacted;[4] the Department of Justice approved the map on November 21, 2011.[5]

Overview

The table below shows the total number and percentage of votes, as well as the number of seats gained and lost by each political party in the election for the United States House of Representatives in Alabama.
United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2012[6]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,233,624 63.8% 6 -
Democratic 693,498 35.9% 1 -
Write-in 6,508 0.3% 0 -
Totals 1,933,630 100% 7

District 1

The redrawn 1st district remains based in Mobile and continues to include the entirety of the state's coast.[4] Republican Jo Bonner, who has represented the 1st district since 2003, sought re-election.[7] Peter Gounares, a real estate broker who unsuccessfully challenged Bonner in the Republican primary in 2010;[8] Pete Riehm, a real estate agent;[9] and Dean Young, a businessman and conservative activist,[10] challenged Bonner in the Republican primary. Bonner defeated his three challengers.[11]

No Democrats qualified to seek the nomination. Clint Moser, who had planned to run against Bonner as an independent, did not do so.[11] Bonner easily won re-election on November 6, 2012.

Primary results
Republican primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner 48,481 55.5%
Republican Dean Young 21,216 24.3%
Republican Pete Riehm 13,744 15.8%
Republican Peter Gounares 3,828 4.4%
Totals 87,269 100%
General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 196,374 97.9%
Write-ins Others 4,302 2.1%
Totals 200,676 100%

District 2

The redrawn 2nd district is based in the suburbs of Montgomery and covers the southeast of the state.[4] Republican Martha Roby, who has represented the 2nd district since January 2011, sought re-election in 2012.[13]

Therese Ford challenged Roby as the Democratic candidate.[13] Former U.S. Representative Bobby Bright, whom Roby defeated in the 2010 general election, decided not to run again.[14] Roby won re-election on November 6, 2012.

General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha Roby (Incumbent) 180,591 63.7%
Democratic Therese Ford 103,092 36.2%
Write-ins Others 270 0.1%
Totals 283,953 100%

District 3

The redrawn 3rd district is more favorable to Republicans than its previous incarnation.[4] Republican Mike Rogers, who has represented the 3rd district since 2003, sought re-election.[13] John Andrew Harris, who works in the child nutrition program for Auburn City Schools, challenged Rogers unsuccessfully.[15]

General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 175,306 64.0%
Democratic John Andrew Harris 98,141 35.8%
Write-ins Others 483 0.2%
Totals 273,390 100%

District 4

The northern part of Tuscaloosa County was added to the 4th district during redistricting, while most of Blount County was removed.[4] Republican Robert Aderholt, who has represented the 4th district since 1997, sought re-election. State representative Daniel Boman, and Rick Neighbors, a former plant supervisor, sought the Democratic nomination to challenge Aderholt.[16] Boman defeated Neighbors, but Aderholt won the general election on November 6, 2012.

Primary results
Democratic primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Boman 10,969 51.4%
Democratic Rick Neighbors 10,353 48.6%
Totals 21,322 100%
General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Aderholt (Incumbent) 199,071 74.0%
Democratic Daniel H. Boman 69,706 25.9%
Write-ins Others 341 0.1%
Totals 269,118 100%

District 5

Lawrence and Colbert County were moved from the 4th district to the 5th district during redistricting.[4] Republican Mo Brooks, who represented the 5th district since January 2011, sought re-election. Parker Griffith, who represented the district from 2009 to 2011 and was defeated by Brooks in the Republican primary in 2010, again challenged Brooks in the Republican primary.[18] Brooks defeated Griffith. Charlie Holley, a Baptist minister, unsuccessfully challenged Brooks as the Democratic nominee.[19] Brooks won the November 6, 2012 general election.

Primary results
Republican primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mo Brooks 65,155 71.0%
Republican Parker Griffith 26,693 29.0%
Totals 91,848 100%
General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mo Brooks (Incumbent) 189,185 64.9%
Democratic Charlie L. Holley 101,772 34.9%
Write-ins Others 336 0.1%
Totals 291,293 99.9%

District 6

The redrawn 6th district is centered around the suburbs of Birmingham.[4] Republican Spencer Bachus, who has represented Alabama's 6th congressional district since 1993, sought re-election.[20]

State Senator Scott Beason;[21] Al Mickle, a businessman and Tea Party activist;[22] and Blount County Probate Judge David Standridge[23] challenged Bachus in the Republican primary. Justin Barkley had planned to challenge Bachus, but dropped his bid in January 2012.[24] Stan Pate, a businessman, planned to run but ended his bid in February 2012.[25] Bachus defeated his three primary challengers.

Col. Penny Bailey, a retired Air Force Colonel; and William G. Barnes, an attorney and Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate in 2010, sought the Democratic nomination.[20] Bailey defeated Barnes, but Bachus won the general election on November 6, 2012.

Primary results
Republican primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Spencer Bachus 63,359 61.5%
Republican Scott Beason 28,671 27.9%
Republican David Standridge 8,120 7.9%
Republican Al Mickle 2,929 2.9%
Republican Stan Pate 33 0.0%
Totals 103,112 100%
Democratic primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Penny Bailey 5,061 61.0%
Democratic William Barnes 3,229 39.0%
Totals 8,290 100%
General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Spencer Bachus (Incumbent) 219,262 71.2%
Democratic Penny "Colonel" Bailey 88,267 28.6%
Write-ins Others 573 0.2%
Totals 308,102 100%

District 7

The redrawn 7th district, located on the state's western border, is 64% African American and was made even more favorable to Democrats in the 2010 redistricting.[4] Incumbent Terri Sewell, who has represented the 7th district since January 2011, sought re-election.[26] Don Chamberlain[27] and Phil Norris, a retired United States Navy submariner,[26] sought the Republican nomination to challenge Sewell. Chamberlain defeated Norris, then Sewell won the general election on November 6, 2012. She is the only Democrat in Alabama's Congressional delegation.

Primary results
Republican primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Chamberlain 11,537 66.1%
Republican Phillip Norris 5,918 33.9%
Totals 17,455 100%
General Election
General Election Results - 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Terri A. Sewell (Incumbent) 232,520 75.8%
Republican Don Chamberlain 73,835 24.1%
Write-ins Others 203 0.1%
Totals 306,558 100%

References

  1. ^ "2012 Scheduled Elections".  
  2. ^ Averette, Justin (June 2, 2011). "Senate, House both approve new map with Chilton in 6th District". The Clanton Advertiser. Retrieved June 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ Lowry, Bob (June 8, 2011). "Bentley rejects Huntsville's alternative redistricting plan; signs Legislature's plan into law".  
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Miller, Joshua (June 14, 2011). "Race Ratings: GOP Safe as Can Be in Alabama".  
  5. ^ Miller, Joshua (November 21, 2011). "Justice Department Clears New Alabama Lines".  
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Secretary of State Canvass of Results General Election November 6, 2012". 
  7. ^ Talbot, George (January 13, 2012). "2012 Elections: Candidates qualify for election in Mobile, Baldwin counties".  
  8. ^ Talbot, George (November 21, 2011). "Peter Gounares to run for 1st Congressional District seat".  
  9. ^ Altman, George (September 27, 2011). "Pete Riehm, second conservative challenger to Rep. Jo Bonner, launches campaign".  
  10. ^ Altman, George (August 18, 2011). "Conservative Orange Beach businessman Dean Young to challenge Jo Bonner in GOP primary".  
  11. ^ a b Altman, George (March 13, 2012). "Rep. Jo Bonner wins GOP nomination for Alabama's 1st Congressional District".  
  12. ^ a b c d "Republican Primary Results - Certified".  
  13. ^ a b c Kitchen, Sebastian (January 14, 2012). "Candidates qualify for elections".  
  14. ^ "Bobby Bright decides against another run for Congress". al.com.  
  15. ^ Morand, Rachel (January 19, 2012). "Primary election races set for campaigning". The Auburn Villager. Retrieved January 30, 2012. 
  16. ^ Doyle, Steve (January 14, 2012). "Congressman Robert Aderholt draws two last-minute Democratic challengers".  
  17. ^ a b "Democratic Primary Results - Certified".  
  18. ^ Roop, Lee (January 12, 2012). "Parker Griffith says he will challenge Mo Brooks again for Congress".  
  19. ^ Gattis, Paul (December 16, 2011). "Holley's ambition is to be 'servant' as Democratic candidate for 5th Congressional District".  
  20. ^ a b Dean, Charles J. (January 13, 2012). "Stan Pate throws hat in crowded field for 6th Congressional District".  
  21. ^ Rawls, Phillip (January 13, 2012). "Beason challenges Bachus in GOP race for Congress".  
  22. ^ Moseley, Brandon (January 13, 2012). "Tea Party Activist Mickle Continues Campaign For Congress". Alabama Political Reporter. Retrieved January 16, 2012. 
  23. ^ Dean, Charles J. (January 13, 2012). "Judge David Standridge throws hat in ring for Alabama's 6th Congressional District".  
  24. ^ "State Certification Amended-Primary Candidate Certification-Republican Party". Alabama Secretary of State. January 30, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  25. ^ Beyerle, Dana (February 3, 2012). "Pate pulls out of congressional primary".  
  26. ^ a b Dean, Charles J. (January 13, 2012). "U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell uncontested in Democratic primary".  
  27. ^ Beyerle, Dana (January 19, 2012). "Two state candidates for Congress can't vote for themselves".  

External links

  • Elections from the Alabama Secretary of State
  • Alabama Votes, government election center
  • United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2012 at Ballotpedia
  • Alabama U.S. House at OurCampaigns.com
  • Campaign contributions for U.S. Congressional races in Alabama at OpenSecrets.org
  • Outside spending at the Sunlight Foundation
  • Election news coverage from AL.com
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