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Water taxi

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Title: Water taxi  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Keihin Ferry Boat, The Port Service, Tokyo Cruise Ship, Tokyo Mizube Line, Taxicab
Collection: Boat Types, Ferries, Vehicles for Hire
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Water taxi

Water Bus in Tigre, Buenos Aires
Water taxis parked at Labadie beach, Haiti
Water Taxis, Cowes, Isle of Wight
Water bus in Cardiff
Water taxi meets water bus in Rotterdam
Water bus in Bydgoszcz, Poland
Water taxi in Auckland
A pair of water taxis operating on the waterfront of Boston
A water taxi operating on the waterfront in Puerto Ayora, Galapagos Island of Santa Cruz.
A yellow water taxi on the water between stone quaysides. The far bank has large buildings and in the distance is a three arch bridge.
Water bus in Bristol Harbour

Abra in Dubai
New York Water Taxi
Tokyo Water bus

A water taxi or a water bus, also known as a sightseeing boat, is a watercraft used to provide public or private transport, usually, but not always, in an urban environment. Service may be scheduled with multiple stops, operating in a similar manner to a bus, or on demand to many locations, operating in a similar manner to a taxi. A boat service shuttling between two points would normally be described as a ferry rather than a water bus or taxi.

The term water taxi is usually confined to a boat operating on demand, and water bus to a boat operating on a schedule. In North American usage, the terms are roughly synonymous.

Contents

  • Locations 1
  • Incidents 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Locations

Cities and other places operating water buses and/or taxis include:

On demand water taxis are also commonly found in marinas, harbours and cottage areas, providing access to boats and waterfront properties that are not directly accessible by land.

Incidents

On March 6, 2004, a water taxi on the Seaport Taxi service operated by the Living Classrooms Foundation capsized during a storm on the Patapsco River, near Baltimore's Inner Harbor. A total of 5 passengers died in the accident, which the National Transportation Safety Board determined was caused by insufficient stability when the small pontoon-style vessel encountered strong winds and waves. The company no longer operates water taxi vessels in Baltimore harbor.[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Auckland Water Taxis". destination-nz.com. Retrieved July 1, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Ed Kane's Water Taxi". Ed Kane's Water Taxi. Retrieved May 13, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Boats BatCub". Tbc. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  4. ^ "City Water Taxi". Retrieved July 1, 2008. 
  5. ^ a b "Bratislava Propeler". Retrieved November 4, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Hop-On Hop-Off by Paddan". Strömma Turism & Sjöfart. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  7. ^ http://www.deniztaksi.com.tr
  8. ^ "Water Excursions/Charters/Water Taxi". Lake of the Ozarks Convention & Visitor Bureau. 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  9. ^ Water transport of Moscow (in Russian)
  10. ^ "New Zealand Ferries, Water Taxis & Cruises". destination-nz.com. Retrieved July 1, 2008. 
  11. ^ "Bricktown Water Taxi". Retrieved October 14, 2009. 
  12. ^  
  13. ^ "Potsdamer Wassertaxi" (in German). Retrieved July 1, 2008. 
  14. ^ "The Channel Cat Water Taxi". Retrieved August 22, 2009. 
  15. ^ "Waterbus Rotterdam/Dordrecht" (in Dutch). Retrieved September 9, 2007. 
  16. ^ Water transport of Saint-Petersburg (in Russian)
  17. ^ "Han River Water Taxi". Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Local boat transport". Stockholm Visitors Board. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  19. ^ Veetakso
  20. ^ [2]
  21. ^ "Victoria Harbour Ferry". Retrieved 2010-01-31. 
  22. ^ "Water Transportation". Walt Disney World. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  23. ^ "Insufficient Stability Caused Passenger Vessel to Capsize". MarineLink.com. Retrieved July 26, 2007. 

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
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